Thursday, September 7, 2017

SAVE THE DATE!!! Insecta Fiesta 2017

Save the date for our 2017 Insecta Fiesta!


Menu to be posted soon, but expect an Indian/Latin fusion cuisine: sure to please even the pickiest eater yet exiting enough for the adventurous eater!




Thursday, August 31, 2017

Insects and Floodwaters

Insects and floodwaters

By - Mike Merchant, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
http://insectsinthecity.blogspot.com
Fire ant floating colony in Houston floodwaters.
Photo by NBC DFW  @OmarVillafranca
Many in the pest control industry find themselves in the midst of the devastating floods hitting much of south and east Texas this week.  If so, it may be a good time to remind ourselves of some unique pest challenges associated with high water.

Flooding brings all sorts of wildlife into unusually close contact with people, but few critters are more dangerous than fire ants. When floods occur, fire ants exit the ground and float, instinctively linking their legs and forming a floating mat which is nearly impossible to sink. When they inevitably bump into a dry object like a tree, a boat or a person, the ant mass "explodes" with ants quickly exiting the mass and swarming the object.

Diving underwater, or splashing water on the ants, will not help.  The best option is soapy water, which is pretty good at killing the ants and helping drown a floating ant island.  According to the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension publication, "Flooding and Fire Ants:Protecting Yourself and Your Family", two tablespoons of soap in a gallon of water, sprayed on a floating mat is effective at drowning ants.  If any of you are engaged in water rescue this week, carrying a supply of soap along with a squirt bottle would be a good idea.

You might not have thought of it, but bed bugs can also become an issue after a public emergency like a tornado or flood.  When lots of people are brought together in an emergency shelter situation, the risk of bed bug encounters goes up.  The University of Minnesota has put together a nice publication on the subject. If you are in a community hosting an emergency shelter consider offering your services to inspect shelters and treat for bed bugs as necessary.  Don't forget the diatomaceous earth and silica aerogel dusts as a means of providing significant control for shelter bedding at minimal risk.

Lastly, after the storm is long gone be prepared for mosquitoes.  The primary mosquito species in the Texas Coastal Bend area are the salt marsh and pasture-land breeding mosquitoes. These are difficult to control at their breeding sites, short of aerial mosquito control campaigns.  But to some extent, these mosquitoes can be controlled in backyards with residual mosquito adulticides. If your company does residential pest control, but hasn't yet gotten into the adult mosquito control business, this may be a good time to start. One good way to educate your customers about the mosquito threat is the Mosquito Safari website.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Webinar: Meet Our Native Pollinators


Hope you will join me for a webinar I'm hosting, this Friday, September 1st:
2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Meet Our Native Pollinators

Event starts: Friday, September 1 at 2:00 pm EDT

Event ends: Friday, September 1 at 3:00 pm EDT

Location: TBA

Pollinators have been in the news alot in the last couple of years.  While many of us are familiar with the European honeybee, we are not so familiar with our native pollinators.  Join Molly Keck, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension as she introduces us to some of our native pollinators, their habitats, and ways to preserve them. Moderated by Dani Carrolland Sallie Lee, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Cooperative Extension System.   Note: on September 1, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar. If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message.
For more webinars in this series, see 2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series. The webinars are brought to you by the following eXtension Communities of Practice: Ant Pests, and Urban IPM; and by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension ServiceClemson Cooperative Extension and University of Georgia Extension.
Photo Courtesy Dani Carroll

Presenters

 Molly Keck, dani carroll, Sallie Lee





Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Insect of the Month: Robber Fly....Bee, Fly, Bee Fly or Weird Fly? What is this?

In recent months, I have received a LOT of pictures asking for identifications of a strange insect that seems to be pretty common right now. 

It looks like a fly, maybe a bee, maybe a fat dragonfly... perhaps nothing you have ever seen before.  It is actually a fly called a robber fly.

They are predatory insects and some can mimic bumble bees.  While they are loud fliers and scary, they really aren't threatening to humans.  You may not want to pick one up in case it bites, but they don't come after humans to bite.

Robber flies come in a variety of sizes, colors, and looks, but they all have similar "feet", large eyes, and a furry body.

Don't be surprised if you come across one this summer... they sure seem to be the insect of the summer months this year!

Photo by Bart Drees


Photo by Bart Drees

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Drain Flies, House Flies, and Fungus Gnats


2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Drain Flies, House Flies, and Fungus Gnats


Event starts: Friday, August 4 at 2:00 pm EDT

Event ends: Friday, August 4 at 3:00 pm EDT




Insect pests marching around our homes can be puzzling to manage.   Especially frustrating is trying to figure out where they are coming from, and their life cycle.  In this webinar, Elizabeth "Wizzie" Brown, IPM Program Specialist, Texas A and M Agrilife Extension will discuss practical tips that homeowners can use to identify and help control the problem pest. Moderated by Hunter McBrayer and Taylor Vandiver, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Click here to login as a guest and participate in the live event.   Note: on August 4, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar. If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message.

For more webinars in this series, see 2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series. The webinars are brought to you by the following eXtension Communities of Practice: Ant Pests, and Urban IPM; and by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension ServiceClemson Cooperative Extension and University of Georgia Extension.

Photo Courtesy, Pest and Diseases Image Library, Bugwood.org




Thursday, June 1, 2017

Cicadas Emerging

When I think of the sounds of summer, the metallic songs of cicadas immediately comes to mind.  Cicadas are starting to emerge and make their way from the soil to the trees to serenade us again.  Last night I heard my first cicada calls, but soon the trees will nearly be deafening at times while they call to each other.

Cicadas spend the majority of their life under the soil.  I'm sure you've heard of the 17 year cicadas, which only emerge every 17 years.  But the most common cicadas are the "Dog Day Cicadas."  Cicadas that become abundant during the dog days of summer and take only 2-5 year to complete their lifecycle (still a amazing long time for an insect!)

During summer, cicadas mate and by the end of summer, lay their eggs on twigs and bark.  The eggs hatch into nymphs about a month later and crawl down to the soil and feed on roots.  Usually they do very little damage as nymphs, but adults can be a nuisance leaving markings when they lay eggs on young trees.  The nymphs spend 2-5 years in the soil before they emerge from the soil, crawl up a tree or other object (like the side of your house), shed their nymphal skin and emerge as an adult.  The nymphal skin is left behind, clinging to the spot they last stood.

The new exoskeleton grows underneath the old exoskeleton, so when they crack the old skin open, the new skin can be seen underneath.  The newly emerged adult cicada will rest for a short period of time, pumping its blood through the wings and allowing the exoskeleton to harden before it flies up into the trees to sing.

Most of us can recognize an adult cicada, but when you get a chance encounter with the nymph emerging from the soil, it really is a sight!

Immature cicada emerging from the soil.
Photo Credit: Manu & Indra Gregory

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Aphids, Scales, and White Flies


2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Aphids, Scales, and White Flies
Friday, June 2 at 1:00 pm CDT




Aphids, scales, and whiteflies are pests of many landscape plants.   Learn to identify and properly apply IPM techniques using practical, cultural practices to reduce the pressure from these insect pests.  Dr. Erfan Vafaie, Extension Program Specialist, Texas A and M Agrilife Extension will deliver this training in practical control and identification.  Moderated by Marcus Garner and Allyson Shabel, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Click here to login as a guest and participate in the live event.   Note: on June 2nd, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar. If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message.
For more webinars in this series, see 2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series. The webinars are brought to you by the following eXtension Communities of Practice: Ant Pests, and Urban IPM; and by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Clemson Cooperative Extension and University of Georgia Extension.

Photo Courtesy Elizabeth Brown, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service